How to Build a Corner Knick-Knack Shelf (Doc Handys Furniture Building & Finishing Series Book 1)


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Bob and Rick build the casework to re-create a server originally made of teakwood. Box joints are used as the joinery, and a simple mortise-and-tenon leg system holds the server at a comfortable user height. The Rosendahls construct an intriguing set of three nested boxes. Simple rabbet joints and double dadoes separate the lids from the box bottoms. The smallest box, joined at the corners with a combination joint and a rabbeted lid, can be used to store a deck of cards or other small object. Bob and Rick discuss the practical aspects of designing a stairway: Is there room on the tread for a foot?


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Is the space between the treads even from top to bottom? Is there sufficient headroom? Then they delve into designing a stair built with treads and open stringers to give it a decorative look. The Rosendahls add a pull-out shelf and a drawer with a routed wooden pull to the end table. The shelf makes a convenient spot for lunch, snack dishes, or reading material.

Bob and Rick begin shaping an ash end table featuring simple, uncluttered lines and a clear finish, starting with the legs.

This small black chest has glued-on earth-tone tiles for drawer fronts. The drawer boxes have dovetail joinery and fit flush with the chest facings, and a system of small clips makes them stackable. A brass knob in the center of each drawer matches the feet and clips and sets off the tile design in the drawer front. Bob and Rick use circle work and joinery to create a corner accent piece with three quarter-round shelves.

The shelves, which range from large at the bottom to small at the top, are fitted into patterned side panels that are joined together at the back with a rabbet-dado. This versatile accent table, with its triangular lower shelf, can fit against a wall or in the middle of a room. Bob and Rick work on the unusually shaped legs, including a swinging gate leg that supports the single leaf. Bob re-creates a table he first made with hand tools at the age of This time around, he uses the router and patterns and substitutes dados, rabbets, and mortise-and-tenon joinery for the original butt joinery.

The finished table has a patterned top with an angled bookshelf below, all supported on pattern leg panels. The short, stocky legs of this footstool are angled and doweled to fit up through the main surface, and the box-jointed frame has a cutout for leg comfort. Bob and Rick show the importance of grain direction to the strength of the leg fastening. Angled and shaped legs that are part of the cabinet casework become the frame for the full-sized drawer in the bottom server. A laid-down wide molding on the server top and on the base of the plate hutch tie the two together.

The guys begin a new project that offers examples of many interesting router procedures: a server cabinet with a full-sized drawer, topped off with a plate hutch. The hutch has three shelves with plate slots along the backs for displaying fine china. Cups and saucers can be set in front of the plates.

The ends of the hutch itself are pattern-cut. This unique carry-all serves as a dispenser of paper plates, napkins, and plastic glasses at a picnic or barbecue. A carrying handle makes the whole thing easy to transport. This intriguing tray has angled sides, box joints, and heart handles. The beveled bottom is glued and wedge-fit inside the tray. The top edge of the tray is also beveled.

Bob and Rick provide tips on compound angles, box joints, heart patterns, and beveled sides.

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Paneled on all four sides, this storage box is constructed of fiberboard made with straw, which allows for either a clear finish, painting, or staining. A plain rounded lid and casters for easy moving complete the features. Finishing touches on the chiffonier include dust panels between the drawers, which also act as drawer slides. The Rosendahls start an exotic furniture piece that will feature plywood side panels, a molded top, and flush drawers.

The Queen Anne legs are dovetailed into patterned rails, and the low base table gets a molded top to hold the chiffonier chest of drawers. Without the chest, it could also be used as an accent table anywhere in the home. Each leg of this table is made of multiple pieces of thin wood, bent in a half circle and then glued together. A stringer between the half-circles strengthens and divides the legs, and top rails hold the table together and support the beveled-glass top.

The Rosendahls begin shaping an executive desk with drawers and an impressive top surface, using beautiful cherry veneer and a core fiberboard made from straw. A butterfly bit and the router make facing the material with solid cherry a breeze. The hexagon stool has a six-sided top and six identical legs with pattern cuts and beveled slots. They are fastened together with a glued spline system. Special screwing blocks are used to attach the top to the legs.

The Rosendahls finish up the bedside table by creating and fitting the drawer, which incorporates dovetail construction and wooden slides. This bedside table—part of a bedroom suite built in out of zebrawood—features a molded top, molded facings that inset the drawer, and a plain base with a top mold. The drawer has dovetail construction and wooden slides. This small desk and bench, modeled after a year-old family heirloom set, features mortise-and-tenon joinery in the leg systems, a drawer for storage, and a sloped writing surface with a pencil slot.

These sturdy, stacking sawhorses have sloped legs for stability and enclosed gables for strength. A handy shelf spanner separates the legs and stores small items and tools where they are easily accessible. The table is completed with three legs, trimmed in walnut, and a six-sided center column that's beveled and positioned to hold the other pieces together. Bob and Rick inlay walnut heart, diamond, spade, and club shapes into fiberboard made of wheat straw to create a decorative game table. Using aromatic cedar to add a pleasing scent, Bob and Rick design and build a stackable shoe rack.

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One beautifully designed swan-neck leg is used four times in this unique stand. The trick is in the placement of the legs and the joinery to uphold the top. Bob and Rick work up a tool storage design and show how to build it out of fiberboard made of wheat straw.

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It can be painted or finished with a clear finish. A fine oak furniture piece with a modern touch, this chair-side table can be used in almost any room. Bob and Rick incorporate mortise-and-tenon and router joinery to make it both sturdy and attractive. Bob and Rick show the intricacies of an oak hall tree featuring simple lines and a routed knob to set off brass and ceramic coat hangers.

A bottom shelf spreads the bent legs for strength and stability. This movable console opens to a three-foot-square table surface and includes two drawers for eating utensils. Bob and Rick also designed it to store the two swivel stools from the previous episode. This pine and maple stool is designed with a swivel seat. Sturdy pine legs can be painted in a color that will contrast with the clear maple seat. This plant container incorporates jigsaw puzzle pieces made of wheat-straw fiberboard and can be flattened for storage by disengaging the puzzle lock that holds it together.

Any liner can be used, and the container can be produced in any size, color, or shape. Wide-angled legs bracketed by a lower shelf make up this tall oak table or barstool. A unique design relieves the plainness of the wide legs supporting the simple round top.

The hosts show how to produce a mutton bar door and two inside triangular shelves, then install the lower outside shelf. Bob and Rick show how to pattern-cut the sides, install the bottom and top, make the facing, and drill holes for hanging adjustable shelves. This oak dresser case project is the perfect chance to use some of the decorative molding bits available today.

With a pleasing mold and thick case sides, the outside shape can be produced in one easy pass. On top is a geometric glued-up lid, with or without a contrasting inlaid band. Screw-on brass feet provide a finishing touch. Rick and Bob produce a modern black cabinet on stilt legs. A top, pulls, and legs fashioned from clear maple offset the black box-like cabinet, which features an adjustable shelf.


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  7. Bob and Rick use meticulous layout and bit choices to produce a pleasing crown for the curved pediment mirror. Rick and Bob explain layout, pattern work, and turning tips for building a decorative walnut mirror frame. Bob and Rick rout pattern pieces to produce a stool that is comfortable either for sitting or resting your feet. It features a dip-angle top for comfort, a carrying handle, sturdy legs with rounded ends, and wedges to hold the rail in place.

    Bob and Rick fashion a glass-front bookcase that can be used alone or built as a part of the oak secretary. Adjustable shelves, glass doors, and a molded top cap add that fine-furniture touch. Bob and Rick work on handy cubbyhole compartments and a desk drawer for the oak secretary they are constructing. The desk component is built as a stand-alone project. When it's not, the lid folds up to hide the writing paraphernalia. A beautiful oak table, which can be built as a separate project, supports the featured modern desk.

    Bob and Rick show step-by-step procedures for routing the secretary table. Paduk and ash woods complement each other in this box, which is fastened together with box corners, a front splice, and heart joinery that is both decorative and strong. Further decoration is provided by a heart-shaped inlay in the lid. Rick clamps a series of pieces together in a holding fixture and uses a portable router to cut interlocking notches in all the pieces at once.

    How to make and use a special holding fixture for the planer to angle-cut and plane the roll-top pieces. Tolerances are very close when Bob and Rick work with a circle fixture to complete a box shaped like a fan. Bob and Rick show how to use the router and a pattern fixture to shape the ironing board, the round-top door, and the facing.

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    Rick make dados the easy way and a degree hidden joint to cover the end grain of the ironing board cabinet. Rick uses a pattern fixture to shape the top rail of the back, while Bob shows how to measure and cut the mortises to accept the back slats. Bob and Rick build an eye-catching cedar house for butterflies, using matching bits to shape the wall and roof pieces so that they fit together in a smooth, rounded contour. Rick builds a beautiful oak furniture piece for the bathroom, using a special router fence to bevel the angle pieces that fit between the front and side panels.

    The Rosendahls use an ordinary V-groove bit to create unusual stepped mitre joints in the casework and a stacked slot cutter to cut lock joints for the drawers. Bob creates the casework and pattern-cuts the top and bottom caps, while Rick crafts the beautiful raised-panel doors. The Rosendahls construct shelf framing and demonstrate a quick and easy way to use dovetail joinery to attach the shelves.

    Inspired by a vintage magazine table, Bob makes a layout for another interesting jig to cut the delicately shaped end panels while Rick works on the divider panels. Bob crafts a towel ring, while Rick reveals the secret to cutting perfect dowels for a towel bar. Finishing the carousel, Bob pattern-routs the dish blanks and hub while Rick advises how to rout cavities in the dishes. The Rosendahls demonstrate how to create the two-part pattern for the dishes and hub, cut the circular base units, and give advice on installing the hardware.

    The Rosendahls combine a portable router and a table-mounted router with special shop-made fixtures to create two matching side panels with dovetailed shelves. Rick uses a shop-made jig to pattern-cut the steps, fronts, and handhold while Bob cuts the dovetail slots and pins. The Rosendahls demonstrate how to combine a portable plunge router and a special, shop-made fixture to create sturdy, laminated wheels. Want to Read Currently Reading Read.

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    Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Tom Savage Illustrator. This series of how-to e-books are illustrated and written in plain, easy to understand language with the beginning Do-It-Yourselfer in mind. If you have a broken door or you want to replace your door for any reason then this book is for you. It will teach you how to fix a broken door or just replace one.

    From screen doors to storm doors to cupboard doors and closet doors, this book covers them all and more. Get A Copy. Kindle Edition , 30 pages. More Details Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

    How to Build a Corner Knick-Knack Shelf (Doc Handys Furniture Building & Finishing Series Book 1) How to Build a Corner Knick-Knack Shelf (Doc Handys Furniture Building & Finishing Series Book 1)
    How to Build a Corner Knick-Knack Shelf (Doc Handys Furniture Building & Finishing Series Book 1) How to Build a Corner Knick-Knack Shelf (Doc Handys Furniture Building & Finishing Series Book 1)
    How to Build a Corner Knick-Knack Shelf (Doc Handys Furniture Building & Finishing Series Book 1) How to Build a Corner Knick-Knack Shelf (Doc Handys Furniture Building & Finishing Series Book 1)
    How to Build a Corner Knick-Knack Shelf (Doc Handys Furniture Building & Finishing Series Book 1) How to Build a Corner Knick-Knack Shelf (Doc Handys Furniture Building & Finishing Series Book 1)
    How to Build a Corner Knick-Knack Shelf (Doc Handys Furniture Building & Finishing Series Book 1) How to Build a Corner Knick-Knack Shelf (Doc Handys Furniture Building & Finishing Series Book 1)

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